Guest Blog by Susan Martin

Stress is the body’s reaction to potentially harmful situations. These can be real or perceived but when we feel threatened, a chemical reaction occurs in our bodies that allows us to act and prevent injury. This reaction is often known as the “fight-or-flight” response. During this time our heart rate increases, breathing quickens, muscles tighten, and blood pressure rises getting us ready to take action. In this way our bodies are designed to handle small doses of stress. However, we are not equipped to handle long-term, chronic stress without both mental and physical consequences.

What causes stress in one person may be of little concern to another. Some people are better able to handle stress than others. And, not all stress is bad. In small doses, stress can help you accomplish tasks and prevent you from getting injured. It’s the constant, excessive stress that wears us down and causes issues.

Stress can affect all aspects of your life, including your emotions, behaviours, thinking ability, and physical health.

Some physical symptoms of stress include:

  • Low energy
  • Headaches
  • Upset stomach, including diarrhoea, constipation, and nausea
  • Aches, pains, and tense muscles
  • Insomnia or poor sleep quality
  • Frequent infections
  • Clenched jaw and grinding teeth

 

If you are suffering physical symptoms of excess stress then massage, in its many forms, may be able to help you. Through touch, massage activates the nerve cell receptors under the skin and stimulates the parasympathetic nervous system. This generates a calming effect through the release of mood-enhancing chemicals such as dopamine and serotonin. It will also reduce the stress hormones cortisol and adrenaline.

Massage has also been shown to provide the following physical benefits that are of relevance to clients with excess stress:

  • Release of muscle tension, including tension headaches
  • Decrease in pain from this tension
  • Improved blood circulation
  • Decreased blood pressure
  • Lower resting heart rate
  • Improved sleep quality and quantity
  • Increase in white blood cell count (improved immune system)

 

Please get in touch if you have any questions, or need some general lifestyle advice.

If you have a diagnosed mental health condition, please check with your doctor before considering massage as it is not suitable for all and other strategies may help you more.

If you’d like to know more about how massage can help with your stress related pain, please take a look at Susan’s website here:  www.sportsmassageearley.co.uk